thecarvingwitch:

It’s about 20 degrees cooler in this shade

thecarvingwitch:

It’s about 20 degrees cooler in this shade

(Source: katara, via popthirdworld)

(Source: groundstrokes)

hadeiadel:

First day at school, Gaza, Palestine.

hadeiadel:

First day at school, Gaza, Palestine.

(via thepeoplewillnotstaysilent)

Say it ain’t so. T-T

Two time grand slam champ Li Na announced today that she is retiring due to chronic knee problems. I’m devestated by the news, I can’t believe we’re not going to see the big game, the court-craft and THAT exquisite backhand ever again. It seems like only yesterday when I started following the tour full-time from Wimby 2013, seeing Li kick butt and have her career bests in the major tourneys & slams, all of which accumulated to her emphatically winning the Aus Open, the grand slam of the Asia-Pacific - finally! Thank you for the great memories, awesome matches and the hilarious interviews. But mostly thank you for solidifying my love for tennis, as a fan and as a recreational player. While the shirt says ‘my heart has no limits’, your influence and contribution to and beyond tennis are also limitless.

Farewell Madame Li, the very best wishes for your health, happiness and life after pro tennis. It’s been a real honour watching you play. Sob.

 #LiNa #wta #linaretired

Say it ain’t so. T-T

Two time grand slam champ Li Na announced today that she is retiring due to chronic knee problems. I’m devestated by the news, I can’t believe we’re not going to see the big game, the court-craft and THAT exquisite backhand ever again. It seems like only yesterday when I started following the tour full-time from Wimby 2013, seeing Li kick butt and have her career bests in the major tourneys & slams, all of which accumulated to her emphatically winning the Aus Open, the grand slam of the Asia-Pacific - finally! Thank you for the great memories, awesome matches and the hilarious interviews. But mostly thank you for solidifying my love for tennis, as a fan and as a recreational player. While the shirt says ‘my heart has no limits’, your influence and contribution to and beyond tennis are also limitless.

Farewell Madame Li, the very best wishes for your health, happiness and life after pro tennis. It’s been a real honour watching you play. Sob.

#LiNa #wta #linaretired

journey-to-muscles:

Li Na retires from tennis and provides us with one of the most inspirational statements I’ve ever read.

journey-to-muscles:

Li Na retires from tennis and provides us with one of the most inspirational statements I’ve ever read.

dixybuzz:

My dear friends,

For close to fifteen years, we’ve been a part of each other’s lives. As a tennis player representing China on the global stage, I’ve trekked around the world playing hundreds of matches on the WTA tour, for China’s Fed Cup team, at the National Games and at several Olympic Games. You’ve always been there for me, supporting me, cheering me on, and encouraging me to reach my potential.

Representing China on the tennis court was an extraordinary privilege and a true honor. Having the unique opportunity to effectively bring more attention to the sport of tennis in China and all over Asia is something I will cherish forever. But in sport, just like in life, all great things must come to an end.

2014 has become one of the most significant years in my career and my life. This year was full of amazing highlights, which included winning my second Grand Slam singles title at the Australian Open and sharing the extraordinary experience with my country, my team, my husband and my fans. It was also a year filled with difficult moments, such as having to deal with the inevitable - making the decision to end my professional tennis career.

The amazing moment in Australia was filled with joy, happiness and extraordinary sense of accomplishment. The task of finally making a decision to hang up my racquet felt a lot more difficult than winning seven matches in a row in the Australian heat. It took me several agonizing months to finally come to the decision that my chronic injuries will never again let me be the tennis player that I can be. Walking away from the sport, effective immediately, is the right decision for me and my family.

Most people in the tennis world know that my career has been marked by my troubled right knee. The black brace I wear over it when I step on the court has become my tennis birth mark. And while the brace completes my tennis look, the knee problems have at times overtaken my life.

After four knee surgeries and hundreds of shots injected into my knee weekly to alleviate swelling and pain, my body is begging me to stop the pounding. My previous three surgeries were on my right knee. My most recent knee surgery took place this July and was on my left knee. After a few weeks of post-surgery recovery, I tried to go through all the necessary steps to get back on the court.

While I’ve come back from surgery in the past, this time it felt different. One of my goals was to recover as fast as I could in order to be ready for the first WTA tournament in my hometown of Wuhan. As hard as I tried to get back to being 100%, my body kept telling me that, at 32, I will not be able to compete at the top level ever again. The sport is just too competitive, too good, to not be 100%.

Winning a Grand Slam title this year and achieving a ranking of World No.2 is the way I would like to leave competitive tennis. As hard as it’s been to come to this decision, I am at peace with it. I have no regrets. I was not supposed to be here in the first place, remember? Not many people believed in my talent and my abilities, yet I found a way to persevere, to prove them (and sometimes myself!) wrong.

I’ve succeeded on the global stage in a sport that a few years ago was in its infancy in China. What I’ve accomplished for myself is beyond my wildest dreams. What I accomplished for my country is one of my most proud achievements.

In 2008, there were two professional women’s tennis tournaments in China. Today, there are 10, one of them in Wuhan, my hometown. That to me is extraordinary! Serena Williams, Maria Sharapova and Venus Williams – with thirty Grand Slam singles titles among them - are coming to my hometown to play tennis for the fans of China! Just as I didn’t think I could ever be a Grand Slam champion, never in my wildest dreams did I imagine that some of the best female athletes in the world could play tennis in Wuhan, in my backyard.

My contributions to the growth of the sport in China are very special to me. But I don’t want to stop here. Together with IMG, my management company, we are putting together various plans on how we will continue to grow the sport of tennis in China. These plans include opening the Li Na Tennis Academy, which will provide scholarships for the future generation of Chinese tennis stars. I will also stay involved in the Right to Play, an organization dedicated to helping underprivileged children overcome challenges through sport. My philanthropic work will expand in scope as I continue to dedicate myself to helping those in need. What was once just a dream in China today is a reality.

On a personal side, I look forward to starting a new chapter of my life, hopefully having a family and reconnecting with those I did not have the luxury of spending a lot of time with while playing. I can’t wait to revisit all the amazing places I played tennis in and see the world through a new set of eyes. I look forward to slowing down and living my life at a new, slower, relaxed pace.

Tennis is an individual sport and as players, our job is to spend a lot of time focusing on ourselves. But no player can ever become a champion alone and nobody knows this better than me. There isn’t enough space here to thank everyone who has travelled on my journey with me and contributed to my success. But I must thank those that have stuck with me through the highs and the lows and have helped me become the person that I am today.

THANK YOU TO: 

• My mother – for your never-ending support. Through the laughs and the tears, you’ve always been there for me.

• My father – you were taken away from me way too early and I haven’t been the same since. You’ve remained the sunshine in my life and I am who I am because of you. 

• Jiang Shan – you’ve been by my side for 20 years. You are my everything and I am grateful to have shared my life with you. 

• My first coaches Ms. Xia Xiyao and Ms. Yu Liqiao - for putting me on the tennis path. 

• Madame Sun and the Chinese Tennis Association - thank you for being trailblazers for tennis in China. 

• Mr. Hu Dechun and the Hubei Sports Bureau – for understanding me and supporting me through the years. 

• Women’s Tennis Association – for your passion for women’s tennis and hard work growing it around the world. 

• Mr. Chan Hongchang – for supporting me when I first decided to become a professional tennis player in 2008. You helped me make up my mind. 

• Thomas Hogstedt – for introducing me to professional tennis. 

• Michael Mortenson – for helping me win my first Grand Slam. 

• Carlos Rodriguez – for pushing me beyond the limits I thought I could reach. 

• Alex Stober – for taking care of me all of these years and pulling me together when I was falling apart.

• Erich Rembeck and Johannes Wieber – for finding a way to make me pain free, over and over again. 

• Fred Zhang and the Nike team – you’ve been my guiding light, my support system and my biggest cheerleader. I will never forget it. 

• To my agent Max Eisenbud and the entire IMG Team - for being the best management company in the world and for taking care of me every day. 

• To all the sponsors that have supported me through every stage of my career. 

• To my relatives, friends, and everyone who has helped me throughout my career – for always being there for me and for your never-ending support. 

• To my fellow tennis players – for being a part of my journey all of these years. I have so much respect for all of you. 

• To everyone in the media who’s covered my career and helped the growth of tennis in China and around the world. 

• To the amazing tennis fans around the world – for your unyielding support of our sport and for playing every tennis match along with me. 

• And lastly, to tennis fans in China – for getting on the bandwagon and staying on it! I am grateful to each and every one of you for pushing me to be my best, embracing me and loving me unconditionally. There is no limit to how far we can take the sport of tennis in China, together.

When I started playing tennis, I was just a neighborhood kid with an after-school hobby, not realizing what magical journey lay ahead of me. If I only knew what a vehicle the sport of tennis, along with my success, would become for my beloved China. While my journey hasn’t been easy, it has been rewarding. I’ve seen change happening in front of my eyes, young girls picking up tennis racquets, setting goals, following their hearts and believing in themselves. I hope that I’ve had the opportunity to inspire young women all over China to believe in themselves, to set their goals high and pursue them with vengeance and self-belief.

Whether you want to be a tennis player, a doctor, a lawyer, a teacher or a business leader, I urge you to believe in yourself and follow your dream. If I could do it, you can too! Be the bird that sticks out. With hard work, your dreams will come true.

LI NA

groundstrokes:

Tennis Icon Li Na Officially Announces Retirement

Excerpt from her official Facebook letter (read the full letter) :

My dear friends,

For close to fifteen years, we’ve been a part of each other’s lives. As a tennis player representing China on the global stage, I’ve trekked around the world playing hundreds of matches on the WTA tour, for China’s Fed Cup team, at the National Games and at several Olympic Games. You’ve always been there for me, supporting me, cheering me on, and encouraging me to reach my potential.

Representing China on the tennis court was an extraordinary privilege and a true honor. Having the unique opportunity to effectively bring more attention to the sport of tennis in China and all over Asia is something I will cherish forever. But in sport, just like in life, all great things must come to an end.

2014 has become one of the most significant years in my career and my life. This year was full of amazing highlights, which included winning my second Grand Slam singles title at the Australian Open and sharing the extraordinary experience with my country, my team, my husband and my fans. It was also a year filled with difficult moments, such as having to deal with the inevitable - making the decision to end my professional tennis career.

The amazing moment in Australia was filled with joy, happiness and extraordinary sense of accomplishment. The task of finally making a decision to hang up my racquet felt a lot more difficult than winning seven matches in a row in the Australian heat. It took me several agonizing months to finally come to the decision that my chronic injuries will never again let me be the tennis player that I can be. Walking away from the sport, effective immediately, is the right decision for me and my family.

I’m really going to miss you a lot. Your smile, your tennis- everything. The way you never fail to make everyone laugh during your interviews. How your backhand is such a joy to watch in your good days. How there are days where your tennis is t e r r i b l e and sob, why. How you name your rackets Li Na #1 to Li Na #6. ALSO, BEST SPEECH GIVER ON BOTH TOURS, not gonna lie.

You’re the best champion we can ask for, and not just because you’ve won many titles, and have multiple slams. Who you are, what you represent- it’s bigger than the sport. It’s been a journey being your fan. I want to be selfish and say I want you to never stop playing tennis, but you’ve given a lot of happiness to me (and sadness, also see: frustration, sigh) and I can’t ask for more.

I wish you all the best. Xie xie, Empress Li. Xie xie.

jelliecakess:

lightspeedsound:

official-mens-frights-activist:

the-real-goddamazon:

sourcedumal:

siddharthasmama:

yes. I am here for this - downplay Europe like they downplay Asia and Africa. I refuse to recognize Europe as a true continental mass. #notsorry

Europe is Far West Asia and will now be referred to as such.

Western Asia.

there’s no geological/tectonic reason for europe to be a different continent from asia; white people just wanted to feel special so they pretended to be a different continent
i’m all for this

bahahahahahahahahahaha

jelliecakess:

lightspeedsound:

official-mens-frights-activist:

the-real-goddamazon:

sourcedumal:

siddharthasmama:

yes. I am here for this - downplay Europe like they downplay Asia and Africa. I refuse to recognize Europe as a true continental mass. #notsorry

Europe is Far West Asia and will now be referred to as such.

Western Asia.

there’s no geological/tectonic reason for europe to be a different continent from asia; white people just wanted to feel special so they pretended to be a different continent

i’m all for this

bahahahahahahahahahaha

(Source: thunreswine, via voguedissent)

"It was through my initiative that Sartre’s preface to The Wretched of the Earth was removed. Let us say that from a western point of view, it is a good preface. Sartre understood the subject matter in The Wretched of the Earth. But in June 1967, when Israel declared war on the Arab countries, there was a great pro-Zionist movement in favor of Israel among western (French) intellectuals. Sartre took part in this movement. He signed petitions favoring Israel. I felt that his pro-Zionist attitudes were incompatible with Fanon’s work. Whatever Sartre’s contribution may have been in the past, the fact that he did not understand the Palestinian problem reversed his past political positions."

Josie Fanon, Frantz Fanon’s wife’s interview with Christian Filostrat  for Negritudes Agonistes (via synaesthes—ia)

(Source: springafternoon, via noor3amoor)

"But, here’s the thing. Arab women are not vessels for white women to pour themselves and lose themselves in; we are not bangles or eyeliner or tiny bells on hips. We are human beings. This dance form is originally ours, and does not exist so that white women can have a better sense of community; can gain a deeper sense of sisterhood with each other; can reclaim their bodies; can celebrate their sexualities; can perform for the female gaze. Just because a white woman doesn’t profit from her performance doesn’t mean she’s not appropriating a culture. And, ultimately, the question is this: Why does a white woman’s sisterhood, her self-reclamation, her celebration, have to happen on Arab women’s backs?"

Randa Jarrar, Why I Can’t Stand White Belly Dancers

This article is a great explanation of the exact sentiments that go behind us asking people to stop appropriating our dances and culture. 

(via thisisnotarab)

(Source: , via noor3amoor)

jadecho:

"Disappearing" at CUPSI 2013 Prelims

in gym class
my white best friend points to the flat of my face
and says “you don’t really have a nose.”
it’s the first time i notice the difference
in the geography of our faces
i wish for a tall, delicate nose like hers
like my white boy punk idols
like the girls the boys see as beautiful

7th grade is a year of disappearing
the boys lounging in the breezeway
cackle about how i don’t have an ass
the department store jeans sag over the thin of me
it’s the first time i learn my yellow body
does not exist here

i’m in college
the first time a man old enough to be my father
hollers at me on the street

"sup lil mama!
me love you long time,
long,
long time.”

his words lick the back of my neck, slow
there’s a part of me that takes it as a compliment 
there’s a part of me that wants to falcon punch the lecher out his face

it’s the first time someone makes me understand
how my yellow body shouts
easy pussy
across the sidewalk
port of nagasaki thighs
for you to commodore perry open
cambodian countryside cunt
to bomb in silence

in the mirror
i want to skin the chinadoll off of me
these almond eyes
flushed porcelain cheeks
that betray me
look how cute you did yourself up today
you were asking for it

it’s october
the halloween store sells costumes called
“asian persuasion”
"geisha beauty to ninja cutie"
modeled by white women in black wigs
cleavage bursting through strategic seams
my skin a little something sexy to don for one night only
they wear the fantasy of it
but never know the itching
how we asian women
carry a certain insanity 
with the yellow of our skin
tiptoeing the ghostland 
between invisible and undesirable
visible and easy victim

i’ve learned to speak steel trap
when talking to white men
keeping my smiles from showing too much interest
because the air is heavy with ghosts between us
chinese women abducted into new world prostitution
british opium ravaging pearl delta apart
in 2008, the 16 asian women in oakland victimized by police
in 2000, the 2 japanese women in spokane
raped by 2 white men “infatuated with the japanese race”
i’ve learned i can’t trust anyone to see me
under the histories this country
has mapped onto our skin

in class
the paper pale english major next to me in
seems too interested
in whether or not i have plans for the weekend
i can’t tell if he’s just friendly
or viewing the beginnings of a porno
in the corners of my smile
i want to tear the “undemanding” 
the “passive” from my skin
i leave the classroom
hoping walking away
is enough to not disappear

(via heauxchinoise)

(Source: vincecarters)

herman365:

Day 290: Herman has admirers
Herman’s outdoor stomping grounds, the park, included a small playground that often had small children playing on it. Despite his best attempts to keep himself camouflaged, Herman would inevitably draw their attention. He did not particularly like his grazing time disturbed by being picked up, but the guardian felt that he was much safer in her hands than being on the ground where he could be touched or possibly stepped on. Lucy, the dog, was often ignored in favour of the more exotic Herman, and she found this incredibly frustrating. Unlike Herman, Lucy found the prospect of being touched or possibly stepped on to be pretty fun when the people involved had faces that she could reach with her tongue.

herman365:

Day 290: Herman has admirers

Herman’s outdoor stomping grounds, the park, included a small playground that often had small children playing on it. Despite his best attempts to keep himself camouflaged, Herman would inevitably draw their attention. He did not particularly like his grazing time disturbed by being picked up, but the guardian felt that he was much safer in her hands than being on the ground where he could be touched or possibly stepped on. Lucy, the dog, was often ignored in favour of the more exotic Herman, and she found this incredibly frustrating. Unlike Herman, Lucy found the prospect of being touched or possibly stepped on to be pretty fun when the people involved had faces that she could reach with her tongue.

"For the white man to ask the black man if he hates him is just like the rapist asking the raped, or the wolf asking the sheep, ‘Do you hate me?’ The white man is in no moral position to accuse anyone else of hate! Why, when all of my ancestors are snake-bitten, and I’m snake-bitten, and I warn my children to avoid snakes, what does that snake sound like accusing me of hate-teaching?"

— Malcolm X, The Autobiography of Malcolm X (via owning-my-truth)

"

There’s been a dangerous sentiment by national press that Asian folks in the U.S. do not stand with Ferguson. Media has falsely perpetuated myths and misconceptions about Asian Americans and have formed inaccurate stories.

Looting stories of Asian Markets in St. Louis vilifying black men. Stories that stereotype all Asian Americans as the “model” minority. That all Asian Americans are geniuses, work hard, are great at math, and dominate universities. That if Asian Americans can achieve the American dream, why can’t other minorities?

Statistics and facts can be backed up by reports and data by the Census, government agencies, non-profit organizations*. “Good” and “Bad” stereotypes are merely fantasy, yet can be dangerously manipulated.

As a self-identified Asian American and Southeast Asian man, I stand firmly against false generalizations and speak upon my own experiences.

I created this video to show that just like in the past, today, there are Asian American allies to social justice and humanitarian causes.
I strongly support the people of Ferguson. May Michael Brown and the countless men dying in our American streets Rest In Power.

"

Kenny K. Hoang,

*For more information: Check out APIASF’s most recent “Care Report” and AAJC’s “A Community of Contrast”

(via fascinasians)